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See All of the Creation Games

Here are 5 creative games for everyone to create using a fun online drawing interface!

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Jean Paul Riopelle, Planche W-X, série de lettrines enluminées L’Alphabet de Thulé, lithograph project, 44 x 31 cm (1979) © Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle / SOCAN (2022)

Jean Paul Riopelle, Planche W-X, série de lettrines enluminées L’Alphabet de Thulé, lithograph project, 44 x 31 cm (1979) © Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle / SOCAN (2022)

Playing with letters

Around 1970, Jean Paul Riopelle revisited themes connected to the King of Thule by inventing an alphabet with letters that resemble illuminated letters. Through this playful exercise, he recreated face shapes or Inuit masks from his series entitled Rois de Thulé (1973).

To pay homage to his connection with play, create an illuminated letter using the first letter of your first or last name.

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Jean Paul Riopelle, Portrait de forêt, oil on canvas, 195 x 130 cm (1951) © Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle / SOCAN (2022)

Jean Paul Riopelle, Portrait de forêt, oil on canvas, 195 x 130 cm (1951) © Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle / SOCAN (2022)

Abstract textures

Throughout his life, Jean Paul Riopelle would amuse himself in the interplay between abstraction and figuration. He never wanted to be put in a box or stuck with a label. Above all, we can say that Jean Paul was free.

In order to illustrate his complex relationship to abstraction, here’s a proposal to create a photomontage at the edge of abstraction using close-up photos of different textures from nature: leaves, grass, bark, moss, water, rocks, etc.

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T_01_jeu_grandpublic_photo_02.jpg (1)

An amusing rebus

Create a rebus based on your first or last name.

Paul-Émile Borduas introduced Riopelle and his artist friends to André Breton’s surrealist movement and its principles of avoiding imitation and letting go of preconceived notions. Games were one of the ways surrealist artists came up with new ideas. Jean Paul loved playing, in all its forms. For example, it’s said that he would amuse himself by signing his last name using a rebus.

A rebus is a way to combine different phonetic elements (words, letters, numbers, drawings and symbols) to reveal a message when each of the elements is sounded out together.

This project asks participants to create a rebus based on their first or last name, as a way of paying homage to Jean Paul’s love of games.

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mutants-de-la-terre

Mutants of the earth

Paul-Émile Borduas introduced Riopelle and his artist friends to André Breton’s surrealist movement and its principles of avoiding imitation and letting go of preconceived notions. Games were one of the ways surrealist artists came up with new ideas. One such game, of their own invention, was called exquisite corpse: a game that combines drawing and writing. As we well know, Jean Paul loved nature and animals. There is a long list of animals that can be found in his body of work.

Take a look at the Riopelle Bestiary (link to come), which lists all of the animals found in Riopelle’s works. Choose an animal from among those in the bestiary and keep it secret for now.

In order to pay homage to Jean Paul’s connection to the surrealist movement, here’s an invitation to create an exquisite corpse that looks like a mutant: part animal, part plant and part human.

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Jean Paul Riopelle, Sans titre (L’Isle heureuse), mixed media on wood, 154,2 x 203,2 cm, polyptych (1992) © Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle / SOCAN (2022)

Jean Paul Riopelle, Sans titre (L’Isle heureuse), mixed media on wood, 154,2 x 203,2 cm, polyptych (1992) © Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle / SOCAN (2022)

Flight

Birds are near and dear to Jean Paul Riopelle. Pay homage to his love for them by creating an animation that brings a bird to life.

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Learn more about Jean Paul Riopelle

The creation of the Foundation was inspired by the dream of Jean Paul Riopelle, who wished to pass on his passion for art, his vision, and inspire the next generation of artists to explore, innovate and surpass their creative potential.

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